Rovi has signed two Chinese DivX deals that will s

first_imgRovi has signed two Chinese DivX deals that will see the video technology integrated into Changhong digital TVs and Philips-branded TVs set for distribution in the country.The deal with consumer electronics manufacturer Changhong means that Rovi has now signed DivX agreements with each of the top five digital TV manufacturers in China. Changhong TVs will have DivX HD video certification as well as offer support for DivX streaming.The Philips distribution will result from a new deal Rovi has reached with TVP Technology Limited, a display solutions provider that plans to add add DivX Plus HD certification into Philips-branded TVs in China.Rovi, which announced both deals today, hailed the Changhong deal as a “significant milestone” for the company as it continues to gain momentum in the country with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and original design manufacturers (ODMs) – companies that design products that are then branded by another firm.The TVP Technology comes after Rovi in January announced a deal with Mei Ah Digital and China Mobile Hong Kong to use DivX Plus Streaming to deliver premium entertainment services to mobile users.“As a premier ODM, TVP’s support for DivX technology further reinforces Rovi’s momentum in this rapidly growing market and highlights the universal value and appeal of the DivX Certified Program,” Rovi senior VP, sales and marketing, Simon Adams.“Philips TVs will add to the already expansive DivX ecosystem and increase the number of options for consumers who want to access and enjoy a growing catalog of Hollywood entertainment available in the DivX format.”The DivX Certified Programme lets consumer electronics manufacturers differentiate their products and guarantee reliable DivX video playback across all devices that bear the DivX logo. The format can be read on devices including phones, tablets, televisions and other digital media players.DivX Plus Streaming is an end-to-end solution for secure adaptive streaming for over-the-top content service providers on multiple platforms.last_img read more

The Estádio do Dragão Portuguese cable and pay TV

first_imgThe Estádio do DragãoPortuguese cable and pay TV operator Nos has teamed up with Samsung and Sport TV to broadcast a football match in virtual reality.Viewers equipped with Samsung Gear VR virtual reality headsets were able to watch the match between FC Porto and Benfica at the Estádio do Dragão yesterday in the format.Nos claimed a world first for the live broadcast in VR, using five cameras to enable viewers to choose different angles to watch the game, providing a 360-degree experience.The experience was made available to viewers in the Samsung store at the Fórum Almada and at the Nos theatre in the Shopping Colombo centre.Nos transmitted the match over fibre and a 1Gbps 4G network, using 300Mbps of dedicated capacity.“The Portuguese League is immensely proud to associate to these partners and to this revolutionary initiative in watching a football match. The match opposing FC Porto and Benfica will surely be followed by an even greater number of viewers, to add to the thousands of fans that will be at Estádio do Dragão and to the millions that will watch it at home, on the television. Portuguese professional football and all the emotion it offers will now be taken to a never before seen level,” said Pedro Proença, the president of the Portuguese league, ahead of the match.“We are aware that football is a passion point for the Portuguese people, which means that this initiative, the first of its kind worldwide, has all it takes to allow the users access to an experience that promises to change the way we look at live broadcasts,” said Frederico Paiva, business manager of Samsung Portugal.last_img read more

Sign up to LabourLists morning email for everythi

first_imgSign up to LabourList’s morning email for everything Labour, every weekday morning.Another night of Brexit votes, another significant defeat for Theresa May. Last night, Yvette Cooper moved the motion that its main signatory, Tory Caroline Spelman, had unsuccessfully tried to withdraw. The Prime Minister had tabled a ‘no deal’ motion, but it wasn’t the straightforward rejection that the Commons wanted to express, so the Spelman-turned-Cooper amendment passed against the wishes of the government. Chaotic scenes. Cabinet ministers defied the Tory whip to abstain, and their defiance was ignored in the clearest evidence yet of May being ‘in office but not in power’. (If you missed all the action, read this run-through of what happened, with vote results, lists of Labour rebels and Jeremy Corbyn’s response at the despatch box.)After trying to sneak through a ‘no deal’ motion that actually repeated her ‘my deal or no deal’ refrain, May is now attempting a similar trick with the Article 50 extension vote tonight. The Commons was appalled when Speaker Bercow revealed that the motion tabled by the government was not a clear-cut proposal for delaying Brexit, but a barely veiled threat. On the basis of MPs rejecting both May’s deal and no deal, the PM says at least a short extension will be sought, i.e. we’re definitely not leaving on 29th March. The motion goes on to explain that if MPs fail to agree a deal by Wednesday 20th, the extension length would be decided by the EU and possibly much longer. So unfolds what Olly Robbins said at that Parisian bar last month: ‘my deal or no deal’ has become ‘my deal or no Brexit’. That’s how she hopes to drive her deal through, with the votes of Brexiteers, at the third meaningful vote next week.What happens now? The ERG are split: Jacob Rees-Mogg is making positive noises; Steve Baker remained defiant in the chamber. As usual, a lot depends on the DUP. Will Labour Leave seat representatives be pushed into rebelling? How many? Too early to tell, but it’s true that they are highly uncomfortable with a long extension. Most of that group said they would only vote to delay Brexit tonight if it were short and for a specific reason (approving a deal with a different future relationship).The amendments selected are likely to be crucial today, as they were last night. There are the ones already on the order paper, including Labour’s official amendment, which doesn’t explicitly mention another referendum but simply requests “parliamentary time for this House to find a different approach”. Then there are the manuscript proposals being tabled before 10.30am, not yet on the order paper. An ‘indicative votes’ one is expected, as I said in the morning email yesterday, and this would offer MPs the chance to vote on all the possibilities, from a ‘people’s vote’ to Common Market 2.0. This is essentially the same as Labour’s official amendment, but has a good chance of passing when set out under the names of Hilary Benn, Yvette Cooper and Oliver Letwin rather than the leader of the opposition.Voting today starts earlier, from 5pm. Make sure you have parliamentlive.tv and LabourList ready…Sign up to LabourList’s morning email for everything Labour, every weekday morning.Tags:Labour /Brexit /Indicative votes /last_img read more