AstraZeneca to present Phase III CVOT DECLARETIMI 58 results at AHA Scientific

first_imgData will also be presented on potential risk factors for repeated or persistent hyperkalemia (Poster # SuMDP65). Source:https://www.astrazeneca.com/media-centre/press-releases/2018/the-landmark-declare-timi-58-cardiovascular-outcomes-trial-of-farxiga-in-patients-with-type-2-diabetes-to-be-featured-at-aha-01112018.html Whether clinical characteristics predicting bleeding and ischemic risk identify subgroups of patients who may derive benefit from long-term treatment with BRILINTA, with a lower risk of major bleeding (Poster #Sa2100) The effects of long-term use of BRILINTA in patients who have had a heart attack and who did not receive a coronary stent vs. those who did receive a coronary stent placement (Oral Presentation #102) The use of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin to identify patients who are at a higher-risk of major CV events (Oral Presentation #100)center_img Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 1 2018AstraZeneca will present 20 abstracts including a late-breaking oral presentation on the full results from the Phase III cardiovascular (CV) outcomes trial (CVOT) DECLARE (Dapagliflozin Effect on Cardiovascular Events)-TIMI 58, the broadest SGLT2 inhibitor CVOT conducted to date, as well as new research from the Company’s Cardiovascular, Renal & Metabolism (CVMD) therapy area at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions, November 10-12, 2018, in Chicago, Illinois, USA.New evidence will build on broad clinical research from AstraZeneca that aims to help redefine the management of CVMD diseases and address the need for a more proactive and holistic approach to patient care. Presentations will include findings from some of the largest trials in broad patient populations with FARXIGA (dapagliflozin) in type 2 diabetes (T2D), BRILINTA (ticagrelor) in patients with a history of heart attack, and in hyperkalemia.Danilo Verge, Vice President, Cardiovascular, Renal & Metabolism, Global Medical Affairs, said: “An estimated 20 million people each year die from cardiovascular, renal and metabolic diseases, yet shared risk factors are frequently not diagnosed or addressed holistically. Our data at AHA reflect an integrated approach to managing the needs of patients living with type 2 diabetes and risk of cardiovascular or renal disease, and those with a history of cardiovascular disease at acute and long-term risk of recurrence. We stand firmly behind our mission to provide new solutions earlier in disease management to these patients at risk for multiple complications.”DECLARE-TIMI 58: a landmark CVOT evaluating CV risk in patients with T2DClinical trial results showing the safety and efficacy of FARXIGA vs. placebo on primary CV and secondary renal efficacy outcomes in adults with T2D who have multiple CV risk factors or established CV disease, will be presented in a late-breaking oral presentation (Late Breaking Abstract #19485). DECLARE-TIMI 58 evaluated the CV outcomes of FARXIGA vs. placebo over a period of up to five years, across 33 countries and in more than 17,000 adults with T2D with multiple CV risk factors or established CV disease.Related StoriesMetformin use linked to lower risk of dementia in African Americans with type 2 diabetesNew biomaterial could encapsulate and protect implanted insulin-producing cellsObese patients with Type 1 diabetes could safely receive robotic pancreas transplantIn September 2018, AstraZeneca announced that FARXIGA met its primary safety endpoint of non-inferiority for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and achieved a statistically-significant reduction in the composite endpoint of hospitalization for heart failure (hHF) or CV death, one of the two primary efficacy endpoints. Additionally, fewer MACE events were observed with FARXIGA for the other primary efficacy endpoint, however, this did not reach statistical significance. Clinical trial results presented at AHA Scientific Sessions 2018 will include additional details on the primary CV safety and efficacy, as well as secondary renal efficacy outcomes from DECLARE-TIMI 58. FARXIGA is not indicated to reduce the risk of CV events, hHF or renal outcomes.Three new sub-analyses from the PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial will also be presented. The trial compared BRILINTA (90mg or 60mg twice daily) plus aspirin vs. aspirin alone in 21,162 patients with prior (1 to 3 years) heart attack. The sub-analyses evaluate:last_img read more

Study Micronutrient deficiencies are common in adults at the time of celiac

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 24 2019Micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins B12 and D, as well as folate, iron, zinc and copper, are common in adults at the time of diagnosis with celiac disease. These deficiencies should be addressed at that time, according to a study by Mayo Clinic researchers.The retrospective study of 309 adults newly diagnosed with celiac disease at Mayo Clinic from 2000 to 2014 also found that low body weight and weight loss, which are commonly associated with celiac disease, were less common. Weight loss was seen in only 25.2% of patients, and the average body mass index was categorized as overweight. The study will appear in the July issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Related StoriesTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTSwimming pools could be breeding grounds for diarrhea-causing germsOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchCeliac disease is an immune reaction to consuming gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. Eating gluten triggers an immune response in the small intestine that over time damages the intestine’s lining and prevents it from absorbing some nutrients, leading to diarrhea, fatigue, anemia, weight loss and other complications.Based on recent data, the prevalence of celiac disease in the U.S. is 1 in 141 people, and its prevalence has increased over the past 50 years.”Our study suggests that the presentation of celiac disease has changed from the classic weight loss, anemia and diarrhea, with increasing numbers of patients diagnosed with nonclassical symptoms,” says Dr. Bledsoe, the study’s primary author. “Micronutrient deficiencies remain common in adults, however, and should be assessed.” Assessment should include vitamin D, iron, folic acid, vitamin B12, zinc and copper.Zinc deficiency was observed most frequently at diagnosis, the study says, with 59.4% of patients having a deficiency. Other deficiencies included iron, vitamin D, copper, vitamin B12 and folate.The nutritional deficiencies have potential health ramifications, though in this retrospective study the clinical implications remain unknown. “Further studies are needed to better define the implications of the deficiencies, optimal replacement strategies and follow-up,” says Dr. Bledsoe. Source:Mayo Clinic It was somewhat surprising to see the frequency of micronutrient deficiencies in this group of newly diagnosed patients, given that they were presenting fewer symptoms of malabsorption.”Adam Bledsoe, M.D., a gastroenterology fellow at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campuslast_img read more

Cloud firm Dropbox surges in Wall Street debut Update

Dropbox shares surged Friday as the cloud data storage firm made its Wall street debut following a public offering raising some $750 million. Citation: Cloud firm Dropbox surges in Wall Street debut (Update) (2018, March 23) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-cloud-firm-dropbox-surges-wall.html Dropbox raises price range ahead of stock debut Explore further Shares trading under the symbol DBX rallied 35.6 percent to close at $28.48, with intraday gains as much as 50 percent, following the offering price of $21.The initial public offering was the biggest in the technology sector since Snapchat’s in 2017 and is among the few “unicorns”—venture-funded startups worth more than $1 billion—to go public.The strong demand suggested not all tech companies have been hit by the events of this week, when big players, especially in social media, have seen their shares dive following reports that a data analysis firm hired by Donald Trump’s presidential campaign misused personal information of some 50 million Facebook users.Created in 2007, Dropbox is one of a number of tech firms centered around the internet “cloud,” allowing users to store data for remote access by any internet-linked devices.Storing digital data from music and films to documents, presentations and images has become big business with the lifestyle shift to accessing content and services online.Its market value for the initial public offering was some $8 billion. © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

Dolphin algorithm could lead to better medical ultrasounds

first_img Citation: Dolphin algorithm could lead to better medical ultrasounds (2018, June 1) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-dolphin-algorithm-medical-ultrasounds.html This new knowledge brings us one step closer to solving the puzzle. A few years ago, Josefin Starkhammar, a researcher in biomedical engineering at Lund University, discovered that the ultrasounds that dolphins emit for echolocation do not consist of one signal, but rather of two intertwined beam components.Her most recent calculations now show that the two signals are not emitted at exactly the same time, although they follow one another very closely. Likewise, she has discovered that the sound frequency is higher further up in the beam, producing a lighter echo within that area.”High and low frequencies are useful for different things. Sounds with low frequencies spread further under water, whereas sounds with high frequencies can provide more detailed information on the shape of the object,” explains Starkhammar.Starkhammar suggests there could be multiple benefits for the dolphin: The time-separated signal components may enable the animal to quickly gauge the speed of approaching or fleeing prey, as the variations in frequency provide more precise information on the position of an object. However, the researchers do not yet know whether this is, in fact, the case.Josefin Starkhammar worked with Maria Sandsten and Isabella Reinhold, professor and doctoral student respectively, in mathematical statistics. Together, they developed a mathematical algorithm, which was used to successfully disentangle and read the overlapping signals.”It works almost like a magic formula! Suddenly we can see things that remained hidden with traditional methods,” says Josefin Starkhammar.Not only does the algorithm increase our understanding of dolphin communication, it could also pave the way for sharper image quality on ultrasound technology built by humans, such as medical ultrasound. It could potentially be used to measure the thickness of organ membranes deeper inside the body, for which current methods are insufficient.Another possible area of improvement is sonars and echosounders, i.e. the equipment used for orientation at sea to read the undersea environment and track shoals of fish.”Here we could copy the principle of using sound beams whose frequency content changes over the cross-section. As a first step, we will rebuild our own equipment which is based on the pulse-echo principle,” says Josefin Starkhammar.Together with researchers in engineering geology, Josefin Starkhammar also has plans to trial the technology as a replacement for destructive testing of roads, for example by rapidly obtaining an image of what a newly-built road looks like under the surface without needing to drill for samples.Even the dolphins themselves are helped by humans better understanding their echolocation capabilities.”With greater understanding, we can protect them from human activity which could damage, disrupt or disable this ability, such as noise from shipping, pile driving in the water, underwater blasting, powerful boat sonars and searching for oil under the sea bed using acoustic methods,” says Josefin Starkhammar.The researchers don’t yet know how the dolphin actually sends out its two almost simultaneous beam components.”In fact, it is quite strange that the dolphin emits two different beam components, as they come from the same organ. We would very much like to find out how this particular event comes about,” she concludes.In order to gather data, Josefin Starkhammar built a measuring instrument with 47 hydrophones (microphones for underwater use) which capture sounds in water in many different frequencies over a whole surface, for example over the whole cross-section of dolphin sonar beams. The dolphin sounds were recorded in Kolmården Wildlife Park in Sweden and in wildlife parks in the Bahamas, Honduras and California. Explore further Dolphins use double sonar More information: Isabella Reinhold et al. Objective detection and time-frequency localization of components within transient signals, The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (2018). DOI: 10.1121/1.5032215 Journal information: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America Millions of years of evolutionary fine-tuning have made dolphins phenomenally good at using echolocation to orient themselves, find food and communicate with one another. But how do they actually do it? New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that they emit two intertwined ultrasound beam components at different frequencies—and with slightly different timing. Provided by Lund University This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Nearly 200K People Have Signed Up to Steal Alien Secrets from Area

first_img Flying Saucers to Mind Control: 22 Declassified Military Secrets Top 10 Conspiracy Theories Why Do People Believe in UFOs? Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoBirch Gold GroupThis IRS Tax Law is Sweeping the U.S.Birch Gold GroupUndo Pack your shades, your sunscreen and your coziest tinfoil hat, because the late-summer event of the season is happening in Nevada’s scenic Area 51, and you’re invited. According to a tongue-in-cheek Facebook event called “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us,” a ragtag army of alien hunters will meet up near the top-secret Air Force base in the predawn hours of Sept. 20, coordinate a plan of attack, then raid the grounds in search of captive aliens. Per the event’s hosts (a page that posts memes and a guy who streams video games on Twitch), the delicate operation will involve running supernaturally fast — faster than the guards’ bullets can fly — but will be worth it to “see them aliens.” So far, nearly 200,000 Facebook users have signed up to attend, with another 200,000 “interested” in the affair. [15 Far-Out Facts About Area 51]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65899-area-51-summer-raid.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  This event is, of course, a joke (please, do not raid this or any other military base). Area 51 — a massive plot of desert about 80 miles (129 kilometers) northwest of Las Vegas — is a top-secret military installation that is infamously well-guarded by fences, radars and heavily armed “camo dudes” in white trucks. After more than 60 years of operations, the base’s primary purpose remains classified and its grounds restricted to the public, fomenting an aura of spooky secrecy that has intrigued all manner of skeptics and conspiracy theorists for decades. This much is known about the base: It’s huge, covering a total of 2.9 million acres (1.2 million hectares) and 5,000 square miles (12,950 square km) of restricted airspace. Officially, the base is part of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), which is affiliated with Nellis Air Force Base; according to the Air Force, it is the largest combined air and ground space for peacetime military operations in the free world. Since the Air Force set up shop there in 1955, Area 51 has hosted hundreds of nuclear weapons tests and has served as a training-and-testing ground for all manner of top-secret stealth aircraft, Live Science previously reported. If you believe the most popular conspiracy theory about the base, one of those aircraft may be an alien saucer that crash-landed in Roswell, New Mexico, in the late 1940s. The U.S. military claimed that the mysterious object was a weather balloon (a 1994 Air Force report confirmed this to be true — albeit, a souped-up weather balloon designed to detect far-off nuclear fallout). However, conspiracy theorists insisted that the wreck was indeed an alien spacecraft, which had been subsequently transported to Area 51 to be broken apart, studied and put back together again. This theory gained traction in the 1980s, when a man claiming to have worked at Area 51 told the news media that he had actually seen scientists reverse engineer alien saucers there. This man, it turns out, was a liar who never set foot on the base (he also lied about the colleges he went to and other past employment); but his stories gained enough attention that Area 51 had a new, permanent reputation as that eerie place in the desert where scientists might be tinkering with aliens. Subsequent tests of experimental, top-secret aircraft at the base have only strengthened this far-out legacy. The allure of the mysterious desert base is undeniable. So, what happens if you do attempt to trespass into Area 51 and liberate the juicy alien secrets contained within? For starters, you’ll probably be stopped at gunpoint by guards dressed in camo, as two intrepid adventurers experienced in 2016 after trying to sneak a camera through the base’s back gate. According to signs posted around the base, these infamous “camo dudes” are permitted to greet trespassers with deadly force — but, if past encounters are any indication, trespassers are more likely to be met with a hefty fine and a court date. When an SUV filled with tourists accidentally crossed into the base’s restricted area a few years ago, the driver and four passengers were each cited with a $650 fine and a misdemeanor charge. The unwary passengers eventually got their charges dropped, but the driver had to pay up — and was banned from leading tours in the area for several years. If you happen to join the joke raid proposed for this September, keep that man’s story in mind. When it comes to unearthing the truth of Area 51, you may have only one shot. Choose your plan wisely.last_img read more

Sabarimala row BJP leader K Surendran 71 others granted bailSabarimala row BJP

first_imgThe accused have been asked not to enter Ranni taluk, where the Lord Ayyappa temple is located, for two months. BJP leader K. Surendran was taken into preventive custody after he attempted to enter Sabarimala through a check-post at Nilackal on November 17, 2018.   –  C. Suresh Kumar COMMENT November 21, 2018 SHARE A court here granted conditional bail to 72 people, including BJP general secretary K Surendran, who were arrested in connection with the Sabarimala temple row. Surendran along with two others had been arrested on November 18 from Nilackal as he tried to proceed to the Lord Ayyappa Temple despite being advised by police personnel against visiting Sabarimala due to law and order issues. The 69 others were arrested after they held a “nama japam” (chanting Lord Ayyappa mantras) inside the shrine complex late on Sunday, defying prohibitory orders. When their case was presented before the Munsif court here, the 72 people were granted bail with strict conditions. The accused have been asked not to enter Ranni taluk, where the Lord Ayyappa temple is located, for two months and they have been directed to submit two personal sureties of Rs 20,000 each. The court also rejected the plea of the accused to permit them to visit the hill shrine during the two-month-long “mandala makaravillaku” pilgrim season. Since a non-bailable warrant is pending against him before the Kannur magistrate court, Surendran will have to seek bail in that case to come of jail. Restrictions have been imposed at the Lord Ayyappa temple following protests by devotees and activists of the BJP and the RSS over the state government’s decision to implement the September 28 Supreme Court order. The hill shrine was opened on November 16 evening for the over two-month-long pilgrimage season amid tension.center_img sabarimala SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTS Published onlast_img read more