Canadian dollar lower amid disappointing US jobs data mixed commodities

TORONTO – The Canadian dollar closed lower Friday as U.S. job creation figures came in worse than expected.The U.S. Labor Department reported that the economy created 162,000 jobs during July, less than the 183,000 that markets had expected. However, the jobless rate ticked down to 7.4 per cent from 7.6 per cent.The Canadian dollar was down 0.39 of a cent at 96.25 cents US after going as low as 96.14 cents US. The loonie had lost almost 3/4 of a cent Thursday amid a strong reading on the U.S. manufacturing sector.The jobs data raised questions about when the Federal Reserve can let up on a key stimulus measure, its monthly US$85 billion of bond purchases.The data also showed sharp revisions to the previous two months, as the Labor Department said 26,000 fewer jobs were created.Traders have come to expect that the Fed would start to taper its bond purchases starting in September. But the Fed has been consistent in saying that such a cut in purchases would only take place if the economy showed sufficient strength.The loonie lost about 1.1 US cents this past week and further declines could be registered next week.“The U.S. dollar has rallied against almost everything over the past week and should carry that momentum in to next week despite a mildly disappointing employment report,” said Greg Anderson, Global Head of FX Strategy at BMO Capital Markets.Markets also looked ahead next week to Canadian employment data for July, building permits figures and the latest house price data.Commodities were mixed as the September crude contract on the New York Mercantile Exchange moved down 95 cents to US$106.94 a barrel.September copper rose for a third day, ahead one cent to US$3.17 a pound. And December gold shed most losses following the release of the jobs report and was down 70 cents at US$1,310.50 an ounce. Canadian dollar lower amid disappointing U.S. jobs data, mixed commodities by Malcolm Morrison, The Canadian Press Posted Aug 2, 2013 8:54 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

Video Business report with Mike Eppel Jan 13

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email TSX composite index on a four-day winning streak, senior business editor Mike Eppel explains. business report|tsx by News Staff Posted Jan 13, 2014 5:38 am MDT Video: Business report with Mike Eppel, Jan. 13

Congress warns tech firms to better protect against malicious ads or risk

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email WASHINGTON – The Senate warned Google, Yahoo and other leading technology companies Thursday they need to better protect consumers from hackers exploiting their lucrative online advertising networks or risk new legislation that would force them to do so.In a new investigative report, the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations said hackers in some cases are infecting computers using software or programming commands hidden inside online advertisements. It suggested tougher U.S. regulations or new laws that could punish the ad networks in addition to prosecuting the hackers.The subcommittee highlighted a December 2013 incident in which an Internet user visited a mainstream website and had all of her personal information stolen via an ad on Yahoo’s network. Even worse: She didn’t have to click on it to deliver a virus that gobbled up her information. And as many as 2 million others may have been exposed to the attack.The online advertising industry has grown complicated “to such an extent that each party can conceivably claim it is not responsible when malware is delivered to a user’s computer through an advertisement,” the Senate report said.The panel said it found no evidence that Google or Yahoo’s ad networks are more vulnerable to malware attacks than other major ones. It said the industry as a whole remains vulnerable to such forms of attack.Several bills in Congress aimed at strengthening Internet privacy and security have stalled, and there currently is no federal data-privacy law for Internet companies. One measure, the 2011 Commercial Privacy Bill of Rights Act, would have allowed the Federal Trade Commission to require security measures for sites that collect personal information.___Follow Jack Gillum on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jackgillum by Jack Gillum, The Associated Press Posted May 15, 2014 8:58 am MDT Congress warns tech firms to better protect against malicious ads or risk new federal rules read more

Gay groups skeptical not overjoyed over inclusion of 1 group in NY

by Jim Fitzgerald, The Associated Press Posted Sep 3, 2014 5:37 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Gay groups skeptical, not overjoyed, over inclusion of 1 group in NY St. Patrick’s Day Parade NEW YORK, N.Y. – A decision by organizers of the city’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade to allow one gay organization to march is a disappointment after decades of fighting by gay groups for full participation, several advocates said Wednesday.Some were dismayed that the organizers had chosen just one lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender group to participate next year after ending a ban on them. Others expressed continuing mistrust.Nathan Schaefer, executive director of Empire State Pride Agenda, called the announcement “disappointing and self-serving.”“While this development is long overdue, inviting one group to march at the exclusion of all others … is a far stretch from the full inclusion we deserve,” Schaefer said.Sarah Kate Ellis, president of the gay-rights group GLAAD, said parade organizers — who announced other gay groups could apply for the parade in 2016 and afterward — “must be held accountable” to that pledge.“Discrimination has no place on America’s streets, least of all on Fifth Avenue,” she said. “As an Irish-Catholic American, I look forward to a fully inclusive St. Patrick’s Day Parade that I can share with my wife and children, just as my own parents shared with me.”The New York City Saint Patrick’s Day Parade Committee said Wednesday that OUT@NBCUniversal, an LGBT resource group at the company that broadcasts the parade, would be marching up Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue on March 17 under an identifying banner. In the past, organizers said gays were free to march in the nation’s biggest and oldest St. Patrick’s Day Parade but only with other groups and not with banners identifying them as gay.The exclusion had made participation in the march a political issue in recent years. The committee said it made the “gesture of goodwill to the LGBT community in our continuing effort to keep the parade above politics.”But gay leaders said the organizers were forced into it.“They weren’t nudged, they were shoved into making this decision,” said Fred Sainz, a spokesman for the Human Rights Campaign. “They were increasingly beginning to look like dinosaurs.“In one of the world’s most diverse and inclusive cities, not to allow gay people to march was becoming an anachronistic decision that they could no longer reasonably justify.”The inclusion of OUT@NBCUniversal came in the midst of major triumphs for gays and supporters in court rulings on same-sex marriage. When a federal judge on Wednesday upheld Louisiana’s ban on same-sex marriages, it was the first loss for gay-marriage supporters after more than 20 consecutive rulings overturning bans in other states.And it came after Pope Francis set the stage for a radical shift in tone about Roman Catholic Church teaching on homosexuality when he said “Who am I to judge?” about the sexual orientation of priests.Parade organizers said they were “remaining loyal to church teachings,” and Cardinal Timothy Dolan, next year’s grand marshal, issued a statement Wednesday saying the committee “continues to have my confidence and support.”The exclusion of gay groups prompted first-term Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio to refuse to march in the 2014 parade, and Guinness and Heineken withdrew their sponsorships.De Blasio said Wednesday that the inclusion of OUT@NBCUniversal was “a step forward,” but he would not commit to next year’s parade until he knows more.Guinness’ parent company said, “We are pleased to see that the various parties are making progress on this issue.” It said it was open to talking with the organizers about supporting the 2015 parade.NBC, whose local affiliate has been televising the parade since the 1990s, would not confirm reports that it had threatened to drop coverage over the issue of gay participation. But it said NBC executive Francis Comerford, a member of the parade committee, helped with the agreement to include OUT@NBCUniversal.Whether it was the mayor or the pope or the people at Guinness who prompted the decision, gay groups took some satisfaction in their role even if it didn’t produce everything they wanted.“This was decades’ worth of work,” said Ellis, of GLAAD. “The LGBT organizations are the ones that put pressure on the corporations that were sponsoring the parade, and when they withdrew it was the straw that broke the camel’s back.”___Associated Press writers Shawn Pogatchnik in Dublin and Jonathan Lemire Karen Matthews in New York and AP Television Writer David Bauder in New York contributed to this report. read more

Proposal advances for Los Angelesarea stadium that could become home for NFL

Proposal advances for Los Angeles-area stadium that could become home for NFL team by Michael R. Blood, The Associated Press Posted Feb 12, 2015 5:58 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email LOS ANGELES, Calif. – A proposal to build an 80,000-seat stadium in the Los Angeles suburbs that could become the home of an NFL team moved forward Thursday when election officials cleared the plan for a local vote, possibly in mid-June.A development group that includes a company controlled by St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke announced plans in January to build the stadium in Inglewood, about 10 miles from downtown Los Angeles. The proposal, which envisions a stadium rising on the site of a former horse track, raised the possibility that Los Angeles could get an NFL team again after a two-decade drought.Los Angeles County election officials said they have verified enough petition signatures to allow the stadium plan to go before voters, marking an incremental step toward an election that has not yet been scheduled. The Inglewood City Council is expected to consider the proposed election later this month.When the plan was announced last month, developers said support from local voters was essential for the stadium to move forward. They said it would also allow them to avoid potentially thorny environmental reviews that could extend for months or years. An earlier review was conducted for the proposed residential and commercial development, but without a stadium.“Ultimately, this project will only go forward if the voters of Inglewood approve,” Christopher Meany, a senior executive with the joint venture designing and financing the project, said at the time.According to election officials, 8,500 petition signatures — the number needed to qualify for the ballot — were determined to be “sufficient,” in other words meeting legal requirements.Another 2,990 signatures were disqualified for reasons that included the voter did not live in the city or the signature did not match voting records. Supporters submitted more than 22,000 signatures overall.The joint venture behind the project, the Hollywood Park Land Co., said the verified signatures marked “another step toward realizing the proposal for a new world-class stadium.” read more