BBA honors Southern Classic

first_img You Might Like Banks school bus wreck injures four Four were transported to Troy Regional Medical Center Thursday, after a pickup truck collided with a Pike County School bus… read more Skip Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson The company also produces popular Bloody Mary mixes, barbecue sauces and marinades.“You can go to any grocery store, and I can pull 10-15 products off the shelf and tell you they were made right here in Brundidge,” Caraway said.Caraway said the products made by Southern Classic Food Group are shipped nationally and internationally, and they sometimes have to go a long way just to stay home. BBA honors Southern Classic Print Article Southern Classic Food Group, LLC. was honored as the industry of the year at the Brundidge Business Association banquet Thursday night. Chuck Caraway the owner of Southern Classic Food Group was honored by the BBA and the City of Brundidge after he spoke to the approximately 80 attendees at the very location where he broke ground on his business in 2002, which has since been converted to the remarkable We Piddle Around Theater.“How many banana sandwiches do you think we could make with a 3,000 pound tote of mayonnaise?” Caraway asked one audience member after describing some of the products manufactured by Southern Classic Food Group.Whatever that figure might be, it’s certain that the Brundidge based food manufacturer could provide enough chocolate desert topping for as many banana split sundaes afterwards. Published 11:20 pm Thursday, January 21, 2010 Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration “Sometimes we make products that go 1,500 miles north, then come all the way back down here and end up at the Wal-Mart Distribution Center,” he said, to a laughing audience.But the food’s journey is necessary to get the food marketed and packaged into a familiar image to consumers. In order to process the long list of ingredients that each exceeds one million pounds per year, Caraway employs a significant number of personnel.“Full time we employ about 120 people,” he said. “In the summertime we’ll be putting on about 50 to 60 more people on a contract basis.”Caraway said his payroll from last year was $3.9 million, a number he was proud could be injected into the local economy. By Jaine Treadwell Latest Stories Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Caraway also said the company preferred to use local transportation companies whenever possible.“JCrawley Transportation located out in Banks is my number one guy,” he said.Caraway said he also uses Troy based shippers Wiley Sanders and Tyler Transportation.Caraway said that at his facilities, he currently has the ability to expand 90,000 square feet.After honoring Caraway, BBA president John Ramage turned the banquets attention to Pike County Schools.“Our Schools here are great,” Ramage said. “If you haven’t walked through the doors of Pike County High School in the last couple of years, I encourage you to do so. You’ll look around and you’ll say ‘wow’.”Pike County Elementary School 5th grade teacher Stephanie Tucker, and PCHS Spanish teacher Lydia Ellis were then honored as teachers of the year at their respective schools. Both teachers welcomed people in the community to come out and visit the schools.Ramage wrapped up the banquet by urging residents to support the local economy. “If we don’t support each other who will?” Sponsored Content The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Email the author By The Penny Hoarder Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Resisting the ever-widening gap

first_img Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Published 10:45 pm Friday, February 5, 2010 The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… By Jaine Treadwell Mama never asked us what we wanted to eat for dinner. She cooked it and we ate it. What was left over, she put in the oven and we had it for supper. And, I can count on one hand the number of times our family ate at a restaurant.Once in a blue moon, usually at Easter time, we’d make the daylong trip to Montgomery to get store bought Sunday clothes. Then, we got a real treat. We got to eat at Morrison’s Cafeteria where they had all kinds of food lined up on the counter and ladies asked you what you wanted and put it on your tray.We wanted some of everything even though we had no idea what it was. One time, the cafeteria lady asked my cousin, Jimmy, what kind of salad dressing he wanted “renchRoquefortThousandIsland?”“Thawsunlawsun,” Jimmy said. You Might Like Let’s put an end to bingo-busting business I’ve never played bingo for money, but I have enjoyed the occasional game. In school, teachers used to have bingo… read more “What did you say?” the lady asked with a puzzled frown.“What did YOU say?” Jimmy asked. That’s a family joke to this day.The cafeteria was an amazing place. When you got to the end of the line, a man in black pants and a white jacket, with “Morrison’s Cafeteria” sewed on it, would take your tray to the table, unload your food and you’d have to put a nickel on the tray for him. My grandmother told us the nickel was a “tip” for the man carrying the tray. We felt like real important people, eating in the cafeteria and giving out nickels.We went to St. Augustine on a vacation and ate at a restaurant that smelled like dead fish. Bubba got sick. I would have too except I breathed into my napkin. Once we went to New Orleans and stopped at a hotdog stand on the way. Later, we ate at a swanky French restaurant. Daddy said he could have bought the hotdog stand for what he paid for that fancy food. I don’t know what I ate but the hotdog was better.Most of our eating and entertainment was right at home.For a long time, we just had a radio. Mama listened to country music in the daytime and, on Saturday night, we — Mama and me — would listen to the Grand Ole Opry. Daddy said he couldn’t stand to listen to hillbillies singing through their noses so he went to bed.I liked hillbilly music and that was about all that I heard until my grandparents, Mommie and Pop, got a television.It was unbelievable that talking, moving pictures could be in a box. On Saturday nights, we’d watch The Hit Parade. We’d be on pins and needles as they counted down to the Number One song of the week. The singers would take turns singing the top songs. Snooky Lanson and Gisele MacKenzie were our favorite singers.They didn’t just stand behind a microphone and sing. Like, when Snooky Lanson sang, “Autumn leaves drift by my window. Those autumn leaves of red and gold,” leaves would come floating across the screen. Of course, the leaves weren’t red and gold. Everything on television was black and white.But the all-time favorite song on “The Hit Parade” for me and my cousin, Net, was “Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White.”We liked it so much that we bought the sheet music. I played it on the trumpet and Net sang.“It’s cherry piiiiiiiink andappul bloooooosom white.”We were goooood.If “American Idol” had been on television back then, life would have been very different for Net and me.A little tag about old time television. When color televisions came out, only a few programs were televised in color.When they were, an announcer would come on and say, “The following program is being brought to you in black and white and in color.”Uncle Willie was watching and listening. Following the announcement he announced, “I can’t tell a damn bit of difference when it’s in color or in black and white.”We all laughed because Uncle Willie didn’t have a color television set.No, the generation gap wasn’t so wide back then because children stayed pretty close to home and under our mamas’ wings.But the gap between this e-generation and my generation is wider than the Grand Canyon. I realized that when I was trying to watch the Grammy Awards Sunday night. I had great interest in the Traditional Folk Music category and was waiting in “suffer-age.”One female singer was causing quite a commotion. She was making mouth noises and dancing at the same time. Soldiers – centuries – were marching along in puffs of smoke. The singer either forgot to put on the bottom of her outfit or they ran out of material before they finished. It didn’t cover all that needed to be covered.The next performers were called Black-eyed Peas. I couldn’t figure that out. One of the peas had a mask on his face and they wore guerrilla-looking suits and robots that looked like the Tin Man in Alice in Wonderland dropped in from outer space and flapped their chest doors to the beat of the music. The only words I understood were “Here I come; Here I go.” I didn’t get the point.About that time, a friend called and asked me to ride with her to see a friend who was under the weather.We sat for a couple of hours and talked and laughed and enjoyed an old-fashioned visit.I was so thankful that I had been rescued from the other side of the generation gap.For the e-generation, it’s probably a fun and exciting place to be. But it’s just too far from home for a gal like me. Email the author Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Sponsored Contentcenter_img They took us where we needed to go. They bought us what we needed to wear and fed us what we needed to eat. They liberally administered the rod to keep us on the straight and narrow.Church was our spiritual and social destination – just about our only destination.Most of our clothes were made from “scratch.” But our shoes were store bought white canvas tennis shoes, penny loafers – we added the shiny pennies — and later saddle oxfords. The generation gap was formed when Adam and Eve begat.Over time, that gap has widened to an enormous expanse that makes the Grand Canyon look like a gully wash.But back during my generation, the gap could be bridged. Our parents saw to that. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Resisting the ever-widening gap Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Latest Stories Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By The Penny Hoarder Print Articlelast_img read more

Parents, teachers help curb testing fears

first_img “Teachers should stay positive and encourage their students to answer each test question,” Grubbs said.“It’s helpful for children to think happy thoughts or count silently from one to 10 while entering the test site to release stress.”Following the suggestions should benefit children when it’s test time by relieving the stress and giving them a better chance for a better score. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration You Might Like Miss Troy Pageant seeks applicants The Miss Troy Pageant is accepting applications for the annual competiton to be held April 24 in the Trojan Center… read more Book Nook to reopen “The tests are coming! The tests are coming”Those words generate as much anxiety in young people today as the words, ‘The Martians are coming!” did in youngsters years ago.However, Elizabeth Grubbs, system test coordinator for the Pike County Board of Education, said “The tests are coming” should not frighten the system’s students in grades three through six.“The tests are coming in March and April but the students should not be worried or frightened by them,” Grubb said. “Students should be counseled at school and at home about state standardized tests. So, they should be anxious only on Assessment Days to show what they know.” By The Penny Hoarder Email the author Print Article Skipcenter_img Parents, teachers help curb testing fears Grubbs said the tests will enable parents and the school system to praise, to improve, to seek accommodations or to address the performance level of children.Grubbs suggested ways that dedicated parents, school supporters and community friends can help put children’s minds at ease.“Children should get enough sleep on nights before the tests,” she said. “Parents can play educational games with their children and provide their children with healthy snacks and nutritional meals.”Teachers should encourage students to proofread their homework in order to develop a habit of proofreading test answers. Published 11:02 pm Thursday, March 18, 2010 Latest Stories By Jaine Treadwell Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Sponsored Content The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

One man’s junk, another man’s treasure

first_imgSkip Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Sponsored Content Latest Stories Book Nook to reopen If the tools of Schofield’s trade were more than tin snips, a drill, a hammer and a can of paint, he wouldn’t have such a mobile studio. But, he needs little more to produce his art that he dubs “tin can art.”Everything that he uses in his art is recycled material.“I’ve recycled so much stuff that the government ought to give me a tax break,” Schofield said, laughing. “Most of what I do is flower art that is made from gallon tin cans. The lady over at the nursing home in Luverne saves them for me. That’s keeps the cans out of the garbage dumb so my art is environment friendly.”“Friendly” just might be the best word to describe Schofield’s tin can art. The term “shade tree mechanic” is familiar to most folks who live in the rural South and, probably, to those who live in other rural areas of the country.However, “shade tree artist” might just be particular to rural Pike County, Alabama.If there is another artist whose studio moves with the shade cast by the tall oaks in his yard, it has yet to be documented. By The Penny Hoarder “It makes you smile. It’s fun art. Happy art.”Flowers have that effect on folks, even when the flowers are made of tin and void of the sweet scent that most flowers have in their favor.“I got the idea of making tin flowers from going to arts and crafts shows,” Schofield said. “I’d see something that I liked and I’d think, ‘I can go home and make that and probably make it just as good …or better.”But, in that respect, Schofield is different from many others who leave arts and crafts shows with the same “can do” attitude. The difference is that he “can do.” The tin can flowers “blooming” around his home in Henderson are proof of that.“Those three big flowers over by the fence are gifts to my wife and daughters for Father’s Day,” Schofield said, with a smile of satisfaction at the twist he put on the day for dads. “Yeah. I gave them gifts from me on Father’s Day. Those are the biggest flowers that I have made. They took a little longer than usual”The “usual” flower, whether it is sunflower, daisy or daffodil, takes a little more than an hour.“I have to get off the label and clean the can and then cut the tin strips the size that I want,” Schofield said. “I’ve rigged up some spacers that I use for cutting. During the summer, I get some good help from my six-year-old grandson, Jake Hughes. I do the cutting and he hammers the tin down. He’s good at it.”The sides of the tin cans make the petals and leaves of the flowers and lid of the can is the center of the flower. The stems are made from old hog panels and are strong and sturdy as are the flowers, which can hold their heads up in a pretty stiff breeze.“The flowers are durable and I can make them any color you want,” Schofield said. “A lady has asked me to make some Auburn and Alabama flowers. The center of the Auburn flower will be blue and the petals, orange. The Alabama flower will be crimson with a white center.”Schofield said he’ll even make a “house divided” flower so football fans can show their colors in the fall and on through the winter when other flowers have faded.But Schofield’s art isn’t limited to flowers. He has the “power” to make other yard ornaments.“I make bird feeders and bird baths from old dishes,” he said. “I drill holes in the glassware and use arrow shafts for poles. Cups and saucers make combination baths and feeders and the bowls are mainly bird baths.”Schofield usually scopes out garage sales for items for the birds but often people bring their own glassware for him to use.“Some people want to have garden ornaments that mean something to them,” he said. “I’m always glad to use their items.”Schofield also makes wind chimes from recycled materials. The lids to cooking pots, silverware, graters, colanders, sifters, just anything that will jingle in the wind.He grows the gourds that he paints to perk up a garden or lawn or make a home for martins and bluebirds.“I make some wooden trucks and tractors for kids out of scrap wood,” he said with a twinkle in his eye. “The real special ones, I make for my grandkids.”Jake dropped the hammer – the one with his name on it – and proudly held up a wood toy. “It’s a skidder. It pushes down trees and picks up logs,” he said. “My granddaddy made it for me. We go in the woods and get sticks and make walking sticks, too. We do a lot of things.”Schofield designs “Welcome” signs for homesteads and will craft cheerful “Keep Out” signs if asked.“I’ll do whatever people want from recycled items,” he said.“This kind of art keeps things out of the landfills and also gives new life to old items that would normally be thrown away or put on a shelf and forgotten.”With Billy Schofield’s creative bent, Grandma’s teacup could be a bath for baby birds. Grandpa’s Prince Albert could be “chiming” away on the back porch and, tin can flowers, nodding in their bed.Or somebody’s little boy could be hauling stick logs on a skidder much like the one he makes for his own grandson.What Billy Schofield thought he could do, he tin sure can. Published 9:45 pm Friday, June 25, 2010 Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Billy Schofield of the Henderson community is just that, a shade tree artist.“I work where the shade is,” Schofield said, laughing. “Early morning the shade is on this side of the workshop. Later in the morning, I move over to other side and keep moving with the shade.”Of course, when the weather turns brisk, Schofield moves his studio inside the large workshop he built himself. And, when the weather turns downright cold, he edges closer to the wood stove over by the far wall. You Might Like Benton brothers spread cheer with music A merry heart doeth good like a medicine. So does music. The life philosophy of the Benton Brothers, Alex and… read more Email the author Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… By Jaine Treadwell One man’s junk, another man’s treasure Print Article Plans underway for historic Pike County celebrationlast_img read more

Thomas: Sewage more costly than water

first_img Things have changed since 1977 when Brundidge residents paid a basic rate of $2.50 for their water and a $1.25 base rate for sewage.Today, residents pay a fixed rate per thousand gallons and, as a result, residents, in most cases, are paying more for sewage than for water. And, many people are asking how they disbursed more water than they use.Britt Thomas, city manager, said that the simple explanation is providing sewage costs the city more than supplying water. By Jaine Treadwell The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel “And the environmental regulations require the city to upgrade our sewage system and wastewater treatment facility,” Thomas said. “From 1977 until now, the city of Brundidge has spent between $5 and $6 million in upgrades.”As far as the monthly residential charges, Thomas said the sewage rates are based on water usage but they are not a percentage of the water used. Thomas: Sewage more costly than water Book Nook to reopen Email the author “It just costs more to install and maintain sewage service than water service,” Thomas said. “The city has three water wells, one on College Street that was installed in 1948; one on Elm Street that was installed in 1969; and the well at Wal-Mart that was installed in 2002. The wholesale electric charges to the city for those three wells in fiscal year 2010 was $28,000.“In comparison, for fiscal year 2010, the power to operate the city’s 11 sewage pumping stations and to treat the sewage at the wastewater plant was $175,000. That’s a big difference in cost.”In the area of maintenance, if one of the 11 sewage pumping stations goes down, the cost of rewinding it is between $3,000 and $4,000. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Published 9:20 pm Wednesday, October 13, 2010 Skip “Water usage is capped at 12,000 gallons,” he said. “It is assumed that if a family uses more than 12,000 gallons that water is not going into the sewer and they don’t pay for that.”At this time, Brundidge residents pay a sewer meter connection fee of $8.85 and a water connection fee of $11.03 plus usage charges. Print Article Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Sponsored Content Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By The Penny Hoarder You Might Like Paulk offers insight into arson probe The state fire marshal offered members of the Brundidge Rotary Club an insight into the investigative division of his office… read more Latest Stories Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Daylast_img read more

Storytelling events selling out

first_img Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Sponsored Content Storytelling events selling out Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Email the author You Might Like Alzheimer’s support group meets today The Pike County Alzheimer’s Support Group has reorganized and will meet at noon today in the boardroom at Troy Regional… read more Skip Latest Stories Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Published 5:53 pm Wednesday, January 5, 2011 Tickets for the 2011 Pike Piddlers Storytelling Festival went on sale Wednesday and sales were rather brisk for the chilly, rainy day.Rue Botts, ticket chair for the sponsoring Brundidge Historical Society, said the Jan. 28, Friday night supper and stories concert at the We Piddle Around Theater in Brundidge quickly sold out. But tickets are available for 10 a.m. and 2 and 6:30 p.m. concerts on Jan. 29, at the Trojan Center Theater on the campus of Troy University.“The supper and stories concert is always popular and, of course, seating at the We Piddle Around Theater is limited,” Botts said. “Today’s ticket sales were mainly in twos and fours and from as far north as Birmingham and as far south as Mobile. And, we sold a lot of all-day tickets for the Saturday storytelling concerts.” “Being January, you never know what the weather will be like,” she said. “People tell us that they like the university’s facilities because, between concerts, if the weather is cold or rainy, they can eat at the food court and then shop at the bookstore without having to leave the building. They also like visiting the Pioneer Museum and the downtown area.”Botts said those who purchased tickets Wednesday also commented on the pre-show music. By Jaine Treadwell Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Print Article Book Nook to reopen The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… “They enjoy coming early and enjoying the music,” Botts said. “We’ll have different traditional music groups to play before each concert and they warm the audience up.”Tickets for the 2011 Pike Piddlers Storytelling Festival are available at Rue’s Antiques in Brundidge or by calling 334-735-3125 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. W-S or 334-735-3675 other times. Botts said people are realizing that each of the storytelling concerts is different.“Some people thought the storytellers told the same stories each time but they don’t,” she said. “It’s hard to realize how talented these storytellers are until you hear them again and again. You might come to one concert and a storyteller will make you laugh until your sides hurt. The next concert, the same storyteller will put a lump in your throat. That’s what makes storytelling so great. You never know what you’ll hear.”Botts said those who come to the annual Pike Piddlers Storytelling Festival enjoy the convenience of the facilities at Troy University and entertainment opportunities in Troy. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day By The Penny Hoarderlast_img read more

Off-Broadway musical hit coming to Troy next week

first_img Sponsored Content Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Email the author “The Marvelous Wonderettes” is a funny, glittery, song-and-dance review by Roger Bean that features a trunk full of pop classics.”Jinright said those who enjoy the music of those decades will recognize songs like “Stupid Cupid,” “Lipstick on Your Collar,” “It’s My Party” and “Leader of the Pack.”“The Marvelous Wonderettes” will sing more than 20 popular songs of the two pop eras that brought us tunes which have endured with time,” he said. “The Marvelous Wonderettes are backed by a live onstage band. The girl-group engages the audience with song, dance and comedy and features a visually stunning wardrobe design that captures both the ’50 and ’60 eras.” Off-Broadway musical hit coming to Troy next week Tickets are $20 for general admission and $5 for students and may be purchased at the door or online at www.troyartscouncil.com. The show is sponsored by the Troy Arts Council and Troy University’s College of Communication and Fine Arts. Book Nook to reopen Published 11:00 pm Friday, March 29, 2013 You Might Like Covenant Christian School Honor Roll Covenant Christian School recently released its third nine weeks honor roll. Students named include: Second Grade, all As: Jake Sikes,… read more Skipcenter_img “The Marvelous Wonderettes” are coming to town in what will be the first national tour of an off-Broadway hit to play in Troy.“The Marvelous Wonderettes” features popular pop tunes of the 1950s and 1960s and the ladies will take the stage of the Claudia Crosby Theater at 7 p.m. Friday.“The Marvelous Wonderettes” will be here for only one performance and it’s one that you don’t want to miss,” said Dr. John Jinright, presenter chair for the co-sponsoring Troy Arts Council. “While ‘Jersey Boys’ was bringing the tight-harmony, guy-group music of The Four Seasons to Broadway, another show was packing the Off-Broadway Westside Theater with tight-harmony, girl-group tunes of the 1950s and 60s. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel By Jaine Treadwell Latest Stories Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day By The Penny Hoarder Print Article Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are…last_img read more

Brundidge mourns death of local historian

first_img Sponsored Content John Philip Johnston, Brundidge historian, will be greatly missed by the people of Brundidge. Johnston provided people a glimpse into their community history that they never would have known otherwise.The City of Brundidge has lost its most important person.John Philip Johnston knew more about Brundidge, its people and its place in time than anyone has probably ever known or will ever know.Johnston acquired a historical treasure chest that he laid open to generations of people in search of their own ancestors and the roles they played in history, no matter how large or small. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Published 3:00 am Tuesday, August 30, 2016 Latest Stories Next UpJohnston’s death on August 26, left a void that can not be filled. But the historical and genealogical information that he shared over the years will continue to enrich lives for generations to come, said Brundidge Mayor Jimmy Ramage.Ramage and Johnston grew up together in Brundidge and Ramage said the loss of Johnston is immeasurable.“He gave us a glimpse of our community that we would not have known otherwise,” Ramage said.  “There’s no one who can ever fill his shoes. He had more knowledge of, not just Brundidge but this entire part of Pike County, than anyone, past or present. John Philip didn’t just know the history, he lived it.” Brundidge mourns death of local historian By Jaine Treadwell Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Book Nook to reopen Even as a young boy, Johnston hung around with the older generation Ramage said.“He just enjoyed being around the older people in our community. We didn’t think there was anything strange about that. It was just John Philip. He was smart and we respected him. We liked to hear him tell stories about our ancestors. He was a great storyteller and we learned about our community and its people from him.”Ramage said Johnston was the official historian of the Brundidge community for decades but he shared his knowledge with people all across the country.“People at the state archives in Montgomery would recommend him. No one knew more about ‘us’ than John Philip. We’re going to be lost without him because he knew all the players in our history — who they were and how they survived. He took us to the dance and we’re going to miss the ol’ boy.”center_img Johnston and Karen Bullard, Troy Public Library genealogist, shared a common interest and had great respect and admiration for each other.“John Philip was an amazing individual,” Bullard said. “I met him when I started researching my genealogy in the 1980s. I was in awe of his knowledge of genealogy and local history.  I came to admire his dedication to finding and preserving our cemeteries and compiling records and information on Pike County pioneers and their genealogies.”Bullard said while looking through courthouse records one day early on in her personal research, she came across Johnston, who was also researching.“I got the courage to ask him how to find information on one of my ancestors.  He did not say a word, just turned around and pulled out a bound copy of age-old news.  He quickly flipped through the pages, turned it around, handed it to me and pointed to an article on my great-great grandmother.  From that time on he was my genealogy ‘hero’”.Several years back, Bullard introduced her brother James to Johnston and they soon became good friends.  Both were educators and both shared a love for history and family.  “They spent many hours riding back roads, working in cemeteries and marking many graves.  They were both good storytellers and lucky I was when they let me tag along on their little junkets.  John Philip and his wife, Diane, became much-loved family friends. John Philip will be sorely missed.Sara Bowden, chair of the Tupper Lightfoot Memorial Library in Brundidge, said Johnson was as asset to the Brundidge Library.“People were always coming to the library looking for information about their kinfolks and ancestors,” Bowden said. “Jean Carroll, librarian, would always call John Philip and he would come down and talk to them. He shared so much with so many. He was greatly respected and admired for his love of community and his dedication to it. He will be greatly missed by the library board – by all who knew him.”Freddie Turner attended Tennille United Methodist Church with Johnston. He fondly remembers the early days of his attendance when the church service would be five or six people sitting around a table.“My wife, Lois, and I had been looking for a church for a long time,” Turner said. “We found what we were looking for at Tennille Church and with those few people that had held the church together. John Philip and Diane were among them. John Philip became like a brother to me.“We had served in the National Guard together and I already had the greatest respect for him. He was a dedicated patriot and he had so much respect for our country’s history. He was dedicated to the Lord and did His work through service to the church.John Philip was an inspiration to me in his commitment to cleaning cemeteries and making sure that those buried there were remember. He was a walking historian but, more than that, he was a patriot and a great Christian. Everybody who knew him was blessed and will remember him as the great person he was.” You Might Like New fire station coming The Troy Fire Department is looking to start the operation of its new fire station in January of 2017. Construction… read more Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Around the WebIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Print Article Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By The Penny Hoarder Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Email the authorlast_img read more

Pioneer Museum holds Blacksmith Workshop Saturday

first_img Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day The Pioneer Museum of Alabama is not winding down its activities for 2017. Rather the museum is closing out the year with a bang-up calendar of events beginning with a Blacksmith Workshop on Saturday and continuing into the Christmas season.Kari Barley, museum director, said although the Blacksmith Workshop is filled, those who are interested in the art are invited to come and watch as the students begin from scratch and finish with a steak turner to take home.“Steve Lowery of Daleville is an outstanding blacksmith and a great teacher,” Barley said. “Slots for the class are limited and it filled quickly. There seems to be a lot of interest in blacksmithing so it’s possible that the museum will offer another class in the near future.” You Might Like The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Published 3:00 am Friday, September 15, 2017 The Johnny Appleseed Program will be from 10 a.m. until noon on September 21. There is a $5 charge for the program. Participation is limited. To register, call 334-566-3597.The museum’s annual Pioneer Days will be on October 13 and 14. The Friday event is designed for but not limited to school groups.Pioneer Days is an opportunity for museum visitors to step back in time and enjoy life the way it used to be.“Pioneer Days is one of our most popular events,” Ormond said. “We have students from schools around the area on Friday and people of all ages on Saturday. Pioneer Days is a family event.” Latest Stories Email the author Print Article On the heels of the blacksmith class will be a special event for kids ages 2-5 and for this time of year.The Johnny Appleseed program on Thursday, September 21 will teach pre-schoolers about the American folk hero, a barefoot wanderer who wore a tin pan on his head and carried a sack of apples on his back. As Johnny Appleseed wandered, he planted apple trees along the way – in about 100,000 square miles in the country’s Midwest.“The Johnny Appleseed program will be a lot of fun for the kids” said Kelly Ormond, museum education and program coordinator. “We will read a story about Johnny Appleseed and sing a song about him. The kids will learn about apples and do a craft that is related to apples. Learning about Johnny Appleseed with be a lot of fun.” By Jaine Treadwell Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Pioneer Museum holds Blacksmith Workshop Saturday By The Penny Hoarder Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Sponsored Content Ormond said Pioneer Days primarily features re-enactors from the pioneer days and military groups and also demonstrators of old time crafts and life-skills.Pioneer Days is a time of remembrance and reflection for those who remember the good ol’ days when farming was a way of life for most people in rural America. It is a time of learning for the younger generations and of fostering the appreciation for the old-time ways.In November, the Pioneer Museum of Alabama will introduce a new event, a Homegrown Cornbread Festival, on November 18.Prior to the festival date, cornbread contestants will be asked to bring a making of their cornbread for preliminary judging. From those entries, three will be chosen to compete in the cornbread cook-off on stage at the Homegrown Cornbread Festival. Prizes will be cookware from the Lodge Cast Iron Company.“There will be a lot of activities at the festival including an opportunity for non-profit organizations of offer samples of their cornbreads,” Ormond said. “This is a new event and plans are still underway.”On December 8 and 9, the Pioneer Museum of Alabama will host Ole Time Christmas and invite the community to enjoy the simplicity of a pioneer Christmas. There will be caroling, stories and cider to sip in a Currier and Ives setting.Barley said the Pioneer Museum has special activities planned for every remaining month of 2017 and everyone who appreciates the simple way of life is invited.And now is the best time to purchase museum memberships.“Those who purchase memberships now will get 2018 memberships but they will also get a bonus of the remaining months of 2017,” Barley said. “That’s four months free and that includes free admission to our fall events.”Museum memberships dues for individuals are $25 and $45 for families.For more information or to become a museum member, call 334-566-3597 or visit the Pioneer Museum of Alabama on U.S. Highway 231 north of Troy. Montgomery D.A. talks about child safety at Female Factor Montgomery County District Attorney Daryl Bailey didn’t pull any punches with his audience at Wednesday’s Female Factor. “If you don’t… read more Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. 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Cornbread cook-off is Saturday at Pioneer Museum

first_img By Jaine Treadwell Latest Stories You Might Like There’s a lot of excitement surrounding the contest and the competition is expected to be friendly but furious, said Kelly Ormond, Pioneer Museum of Alabama education and program coordinator. “Of course, the Cornbread Cook-off is the big event of the Homegrown Cornbread Festival but we have a whole day of old-time fun planned,” Ormond said. The gates to the festival will open to the public at 9 a.m. Saturday but the cornbread entries in the competition should be registered by 8:30 a.m. The entry fee is $25. Sponsored Content Published 3:00 am Friday, November 17, 2017 Cornbread cook-off is Saturday at Pioneer Museum Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Competition in the Cornbread Cook-off Saturday at the Homegrown Cornbread Festival at the Pioneer Museum of Alabama Saturday is heating up.County cooks are rattling their pots and pans in hopes of taking home the title and a super prize of Lodge Cast Iron cookware.The top three winners will receive prizes donated by the Lodge Cast Iron Company. “The judges will determine the top three finalists and the winners will be announced around 11:30 a.m.,” Ormond said. “The live cook-off will be from 2 until 3 p.m. We’ll have gas stoves available for the cook-off and the cornbread can be fried or baked depending on the three winning recipes. The winners will be announced at 3:30 p.m. and the Cornbread Cook-off Champion will begin his or her one-year reign with fanfare.The Cornbread Corner will feature the sampling of cornbread entered by local non-profit organizations. Samplers will have an opportunity to vote for the people’s choice recognition.Musicians will provide background folk music throughout the day and Michael O’Hara and his puppets will entertain on the hour from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. “The puppet show is wonderful entertainment for people of all ages,” Ormond said. “We’ll also have a kids’ zone with lots of games and activities throughout the day.” Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Artists and crafters will have their work available for show and sale and there will be pioneer life demonstrations throughout the grounds.Pioneer Museum of Alabama memberships will be available at the festival.  The memberships make wonderful Christmas and are gifts that keep on giving throughout the year.Admission to the Homegrown Cornbread Festival is $10. Ages 10 and under are admitted free. Book Nook to reopen GRAND OPENING: Neighborhood Barre ribbon cutting Neighborhood Barre had their official ribbon cutting today on the Downtown Square. Casey Browder, the owner, opened Neighborhood Barre to provide… read more By The Penny Hoarder Email the author Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Print Article Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are…last_img read more